Monday, August 13, 2007

Turnips

Turnips, blushed a delicate shade of violet.

Spring. It can't be far now.

20 comments:

Truffle said...

How beautiful! Almost too pretty to eat.

Johanna said...

beautiful colour and what a beautiful knife too - just the sort I never know what to use it for but love looking at!

Kathryn Elliott said...

We've had glorious, glorious sunshine here in Sydney for almost a week now. The world, or certainly my little corner of it, feels different. People are noticeably more chilled-out and happy.

I know we're going to have a temperature bounce, but boy I'm enjoying this bit of early Spring-ness while it lasts.
Kathryn

Lucy said...

Almost Truffle. Almost...;)

My brother gave me the knife last year as a gift Johanna. I use it for butter and soft cheeses, but that's about all - no real cutting blade to speak of!

You know Kathryn, I am starting to feel some of those effects too. Though it's 13 degrees out on the office balcony this afternoon, the sun is shining brightly and yes, even the birds are twittering away. I keep finding the dog asleep in various parts of the garden, soaking up as much as she can!

Figs Olives Wine said...

I love that knife, and you've really captured the yearning anticipation of spring perfectly in this humble little turnip. It's beautiful!

winedeb said...

I have been eyeing the beautiful turnips at the farmers market but my hubby does not like them at all. I have tried to mask them within a stew, but he always detects them. Looking forward to seeing how you prepare yours.

Casey said...

I love turnips when they're small like this. Enjoying your blog immensely even though our season are reversed. Off to read posts that correspond with a California summer.

Susan said...

That soft-bladed knife - I want one, Lucy. I have one, I think, but not as ornate and adorable as this one.

Call me creature of habit, but I've only boiled turnips and tossed them with honey, mustard and lemon juice, particularly the tiny babes.

Cynthia said...

What do turnips taste like?

Lucy said...

Thanks Amanda - the daylight is getting longer and the sun has changed its path around the garden. All makes me much more positive.

You know Deb, I've really had to work on liking them myself this year, so detectable is their flavour, so I know a little of how he feels! Will let you know what I do...

Hi Casey - it's funny to be reading words and posts that are seasonally-opposite from our own! Hope you find something you like back in Jan and Feb.

Susan, I must say that when my brother produced it and its accompanying fork I was deeply impressed. It's old, Japanese and presumably used for fish. Glad you like it. Will keep my eyes peeled for one...Mustard and honey are perfect turnip companions. That's been my favourite way this year, so far.

Lucy said...

Good question Cynthia. I suppose the best way to describe them is to point out that they're a member of the cabbage family, so they do have a slightly sulphurous flavour and are texturally quite interesting - crunchy even. Not a very strong flavour if they are small, thankfully, so they're a bit of a blank canvas when this size! Susan's combination of mustard and honey masks any hint of that sulphur and makes them sweet and tangy.

Wendy said...

A beautiful photo of a beautiful turnip.
I've always been uncertain about what are turnips and what are swedes in different countries. Turnips in Scotland have a yellow flesh and greying, scarred skin. Other than that I'm confused.

Lucy said...

Me too Wendy. I think what you call a turnip we call a swede (though I doubt there's any nordic connection...) and what we call a swede the Americans call a rutabaga...I am confused.

Susan said...

You have a gift for making the most ordinary vegetables looks extraordinary.

Lucy said...

Susan, thank you. I kinda like that idea!

Christina said...

I'll jump in on the turnip/rutabaga/swede conversation. Here in the US, we call the larger, yellower root vegetables rutabagas. In England, people there called the same vegetable a swede. I didn't know that in other places a turnip (which you photographed so beautifully here) is called something else.

Beautiful knife. I want to use it to smear creamy butter on perfect bread. I think if I owned it, I'd figure out a way to use it each day.

Lovely.

Anh said...

Oh Lucy, spring indeed is near! I just went out to shoot the new blossoms! The warm sun is here also...Oh, everything is await for spring, including us!

Lucy said...

Glad you did Christina! It is confusing (obviously it took a gardener to work it out - fabulously practical and knowledgeable lot that you are). Love that knife too...

Isn't it wonderful Anh? The sun, the blossom trees are bursting...not long now 'til I start complaining about the long hot summer!

tippitappi said...

amazing colours again, and wow!!! I never heard of blue potatoes. I'm acrually happy that we don't get them here in old Italy, they sound so GMO!
:)))

Lucy said...

Ah, tippitappi, nothing GMO about blue potatoes. Would you believe that they're one of the oldest potatoes known to man? Grown high up in the Andes for a VERY long time! The colour just looks so very unreal...